High Stakes and High Emotions: Concerned Student 1950 press conference

Reporting on the Concerned Student 1950 press conference was an experience to learn from. I have been fortunate enough to cover events before with emotions running high for all participants. While covering this press conference, I witness very unprofessional journalism and the after effects it can have. It is of the upmost importance to first show and respect space for your subjects when given boundaries. Concerned Student 1950 had made been rallying and working very hard to make a long awaited change in our campus’ leadership and when this finally happened, all they wanted was a time to reflect and be together under a non-pressure atmosphere. In order to assure this, the group was proactive and scheduled a live stream press conference at 1pm. However, the same star of the viral video shot by a Mizzou student, Tim Tai was both intrusive and disrespectful during both the circle on Carnahan quad and after the press conference.

In order to search for a different angle than my fellow students covering the conference for class, I had waited behind the stage exit for the group to walk off. I waited while members were interviewed and asked permission to use their photos and quotes. Journalists beside me interrupted other journalists’ interviews ruining both the camera shot and distracted the interviewee’s thoughts. It is something that takes time and experience to learn when it is appropriate to ask questions and where one should stand to get the angle they are searching for.

Although it is our job to get a story, it is also our job to be respectful. This is in the unwritten ethics of journalism. Citizens of this country do not trust media for this exact reason. The few that exhibit no care for their subjects and only for themselves and their salary are the ones that ruin the reputation for all. It is a sad truth and one that is inescapable. More than ever I believe the Cross-Cultural Journalism class required for journalism majors at Mizzou is priceless. We must learn to recognize our own privileges and learn how to understand where others are coming from. We must understand the context other’s views.

I believe that it is more important to exhibit a high standard of character as a person rather than present a good story at the cost of the trust of the public.

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Diversity on Campus: Concerned Student 1950 news press conference

Colleen Sloyan, J2150U Student Writer

On Monday, Nov. 9, 2015, UM System President Tim Wolfe resigned during a UM Board of Curators meeting this morning. Following this announcement made at 10 a.m., MU students and faculty linked arms to form a circle around Concerned Student 1950 on Carnahan quad to protect them from the media. Journalism student Mariah Brannon spoke of the crowd that gathered and said “Let them enjoy today.” She described the scene as media with cameras trying to push through the circle to get a close shot of Jonathan Butler.

Concerned Student 1950 members shield graduate student Jonathan Butler from the pressing media following the end of the news press conference in traditions plaza in Columbia, Mo. on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015. Jonathan Butler had been on a hunger strike for eight days until Monday, Nov. 9 at 10 a.m. when UM System President Tim Wolfe announced his resignation.
Concerned Student 1950 members shield graduate student Jonathan Butler from the pressing media following the end of the news press conference in traditions plaza in Columbia, Mo. on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015. Jonathan Butler had been on a hunger strike for eight days until Monday, Nov. 9 at 10 a.m. when UM System President Tim Wolfe announced his resignation.

Concerned Student 1950 held a news press conference in traditions plaza at 1 p.m. The turnout to the press conference was more than just media. Faculty cancelled classes and students of all races stood to witness history at MU. The crowd displayed tears listening to black student experiences and held up signs of support.

The crowd raises their right hand in solidarity to support and continue to support change on MU's campus at traditions plaza in Columbia, Mo. on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015. Bystanders joined Concerned Student 1950 members on stage in traditions plaza for the last few messages of the news press conference.
The crowd raises their right hand in solidarity to support and continue to support change on MU’s campus at traditions plaza in Columbia, Mo. on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015. Bystanders joined Concerned Student 1950 members on stage in traditions plaza for the last few messages of the news press conference.

MU senior Frances Silney-Bah held a sign that read, “They think it’s a game. They think it’s a joke. No justice, no peace!” Silney-Bah voiced, “This is just one step. We are not done yet.” Frances feels Wolfe’s resignation is on the way to justice but justice has not yet been served.

Senior Frances Silney-Bah holds a hand-made sign at the Concerned Student 1950 press conference on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015 in Columbia, Mo. Attendees shouted chants out loud guided by members of Concerned Student 1950 for all of campus to hear.
Senior Frances Silney-Bah holds a hand-made sign at the Concerned Student 1950 press conference on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015 in Columbia, Mo. Attendees shouted chants out loud guided by members of Concerned Student 1950 for all of campus to hear.
Graduate student Reuben Faloughi and member of Concerned Student 1950 maintains a low voice volume while scolding an eager journalism student for invading and intruding upon the group's boundaries during the press conference repeatedly on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015 in Columbia, Mo. The student said that it was his job to do that and Faloughi answered him saying, "The next time you try to be intrusive, have some empathy. 'It's my job' is unacceptable."
Graduate student Reuben Faloughi and member of Concerned Student 1950 maintains a low voice volume while scolding an eager journalism student for invading and intruding upon the group’s boundaries during the press conference repeatedly on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015 in Columbia, Mo. The student said that it was his job to do that and Faloughi answered him saying, “The next time you try to be intrusive, have some empathy. ‘It’s my job’ is unacceptable.”
An unnamed MU student raises her right hand to show support to marginalized groups on MU's campus on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015 in Columbia, Mo. Students of all races were present to celebrate this moment in history for #BoycottMU and #ConcernedStudent1950.
An unnamed Caucasian MU student raises her right hand to show support to marginalized groups on MU’s campus on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015 in Columbia, Mo. Students of all races were present to celebrate this moment in history for #BoycottMU and #ConcernedStudent1950.
A reporter and camera man from a news outlet turn toward each other for support after the reporter asks hurried members of Concerned Student 1950, "Why won't you talk to the media?," on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015 in Columbia, Mo on the corner of Missouri and Conley Ave. Media representatives pushed forward after the news conference ended to be the first to capture interviews with Concerned Student 1950 members.
A reporter and camera man from a news outlet turn toward each other for support after the reporter asks hurried members of Concerned Student 1950, “Why won’t you talk to the media?,” on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015 in Columbia, Mo on the corner of Missouri and Conley Ave. Media representatives pushed forward after the news conference ended to be the first to capture interviews with Concerned Student 1950 members despite numerous requests from the group for privacy to reflect on Monday’s events.

Mobile Journalism

Almost every American today carries their cell phone with them where ever they go. When you attend an event and look away from the center stage, the audience is most likely taking pictures on their cell phones and adding photos to their Snapchat stories. As some may say, if you didn’t take a picture, did you even go? It’s an unfortunate quality of our generation that we do not now how to enjoy the moment we’re in. We are so concerned that if we do not share the moment with our social media friends, there is no beauty to the moment. The moment gains importance the more likes we get on the internet. But, here is the funny thing. How many friends on social media are actually our friends? A handful probably if we’re lucky. A thousand + friends is highly unlikely in real life.

With the popularity of capturing photos on our mobile devices growing, it is hard to separate that from mobile journalism. Our lecture on Monday in J2150 taught me that good mobile journalism is different than anyone just taking photos on their phones. There are kits that allow us to capture high quality audio while capturing video on apps that allow editing right on your cell phone or iPad as well. Everyone maybe be a “photographer,” but not everyone is a journalist.

FET_003-1Mobile journalism is something to consider as a possible job in the future. As I approach my junior year with each passing day, I wonder what job in journalism I may have. My interest area may be Broadcast or even advertising, but that does not always secure a job in that field. We have to be trained in every area: writing, video, audio, even strategic communication. I look forward to seeing what mobile journalism has in store for its future.

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http://http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/03/cell-phone-etiquette_n_5367558.html

Women in Media: Missouri Honor Medal Panel

The women on the panel talked about journalism very plainly and frank. Journalism is hard. You burn out easily because you do not have a schedule. It consists of late hours and it can start and stop at any time. However, they corrected the misconception that women burn out more easily than men. Men burn out from journalism just as often as women.unnamed

The numbers of women in journalism in the newsroom are plentiful. The disconnect between the numbers of women and men is the number of women in management. The woman, I believe named Meredith, from CNN digital said, “The suits don’t know the journalism. It’s good to bring the suits close to you when you can.” She emphasized that you need those people to understand what exactly your team does in order for them to invest in you. There will always be a line between the newsroom and the business side but there can also be a conversation. Merill Perlman, a distinguished editor, said that it is harder to hate someone you know. Get to know the suits so they are less likely to pull money from your team.

Barbara Ehrenreich, the oldest woman on the panel, is an author of 21 books. She answered questions with such frank and straightforward responses that she had me cracking up. Barbara told a story about the time she went to dinner with the suits to help build the bridge between the two sides. The billionaire asked her where she thought of all of her ideas. She responded, “in a supermarket.” Barbara explained with an edge that she didn’t pull of the tablecloth of the table but this is what she has to face.

Barbara went on later to answer a question from the audience. The question asked was, “What is one thing you wish you would have known going into the newsroom when you were young?” Barbara wished she knew to be more personable. It is not okay to zone out during lunch with an editor. They are important and it is important to listen to what they say even if it does not directly apply to the work you are doing. “You can not show contempt with what they are interested in.”

The last take away from the panel was about the essence of journalism. Journalism’s essence is mean and skeptical. Trust your anger and rejection. Trust your value. Don’t be too nice.